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Getting Settled In Malindi and Mambrui Kenya Africa

By | January 12th, 2020 | Modified - January 16th, 2020
Aqiyl Aniys in Malindi Mambrui Kenya Africa
Aqiyl Aniys in Malindi and Mambrui Kenya Africa

My Africa Stay

It has been too long since I, AqiyAniys, have written an article here on Natural Life Energy.com and especially here in the blogs section.

I have been in Kenya Africa for the last few months, so my priorities shifted. It is now time to start contributing here again.

While in Kenya, I have been staying in Malindi and Mambrui working on some long term goals. Malindi and Mambrui are towns located along the eastern coast of Kenya, along the Indian Ocean.

While I am here I am learning the about the people, culture, and land.

First Stay in Mambrui Kenya

I stayed at an Airbnb two bedroom self-contained house in Mambrui when I arrived in Kenya. By self-contained I mean the kitchen and bathroom were inside the house. This was a must for me. I love the country, but I also have the city in me.

The house didn’t have a ceiling though, which many houses in the rural area do not have ceilings. They have roofs, but no ceilings.

Not having a ceiling is nice because it makes a wide open space. The roofs contain gaps to let air in and out, but this also lets in bugs.

These pictures are an example of a house without a ceiling. It is a different house than the one I have written about. I donated the money to the owner to put the ceiling in.

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Having a ceiling serves as a barrier, and without the barrier, bugs have easier access to get into the house. Though a mosquito net surrounded the bed I slept in, bugs were so close I it felt they were talking to me.

I don’t know if the lack of a ceiling was the only reason for the bugs, but there we just too many for my liking.

It is safe to say I didn’t have a comfortable sleep. So I left the next day. Needless to say, I also refrain from identifying the place.

My Stay in Malindi Kenya

I then stayed at the Silver Rock Hotel in Malindi, which was a pleasant upgrade for around the same price. It was an Airbnb stay in a single room, but it had a ceiling! It had a king-sized bed, refrigerator, sink, closet space, and a bathroom with a shower and toilet.

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My room also had a balcony, and there was a large swimming pool outside. I didn’t use the pool though because the beach was right across the street, and I like the beach more.

I stayed at the hotel for a few weeks. The owners of the hotel, Cecilia and her husband Nicola, helped to make my stay pleasant. Cecilia directed me to where I could get foods I eat, like quinoa, chickpeas, and dates.

Nicola was very helpful with my internet needs. Many hotels in the area only supply internet access in a central area in the hotel, or don’t supply internet access at all.

Nicola has networking experience and has been able to set up internet access in each room on the hotel. Is it a big task though and Nicola has to continuously monitor the connections to maintain internet access.

Sometimes issues arose. In the end Nicola was there to help me regain internet access when I lost it.

Out and About Malindi Town

You can find all types of businesses in Malindi town, including hardware, telecommunication, electronic, restaurant, and grocery stores. You will also find utility services, safari, large retail stores, vehicle sales, laundry services, and clothing shops.

Muslims of Middle Eastern and Indian descent own and run a large portion of the businesses, and the bigger businesses in particular. Businesses like hardware supply stores and big retail stores.

Though they are of different nationalities, they are Kenyan because their families have lived in Kenyan for generations. They helped to build up the area as they settled in.

Local native Africans own and run many  of the smaller shops selling groceries, cosmetics, and other consumables, and services like barber shops.

Most of the workforce consists of native Africans, because they are the majority in Kenya.  Basically everybody in town are people of color, working together.

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Italian Tourism

There are a few hotels in the area, including Silver Rock Hotel I mentioned above, built along the coast of the Indian ocean. Italians built the hotels which bring in Italian tourism into the area.

Italians frequent the hotels during the Christmas and New Years time. The Italian land owners bring in tax money to support the Kenyan government, and the Italian tourists bring in revenue to the local shops.

Other Europeans live and visit the area, but the majority are Italian. The locals welcome their arrival, because that means they bring their money which supports the local economy.

Back in Mambrui Kenya

Now I am back in Mambrui, working on some opportunities and also helping to bring some resources to some people in the local villages.

I am staying in a two bedroom villa in Mambrui near the beach. Yes, it has a ceiling and is very comfortable. The villa is part of a condo complex and is close to several local villages.

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Italians have developed several villa complexes and hotels in the area. This fortunately brings some revenue and jobs into the area. Angel’s Bay Resort, Che Shale, Karibuni Villas, and Kola Beach Resort are a few.

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The general standard of living in the villages is lower than the resorts they surround.  The foreigners who live and visit the area bring in money which helps support the local shops.

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Some foreigners also provide some jobs for local Africans, like maid services. Many local Africans in Mambrui also travel to Malindi for work.

Gongoni is a town north of Mambrui, that is also countryside, but it has a more built up trading center than the area I am staying at.

People from my area often go there to shop for groceries and small items, but they more likely go to Malindi for bigger items, like electronics.

The People

In general, the people in Mambrui are not well off economically. The inspiring thing is that it appears most people are content. That is not to say people don’t want more, but I think most people don’t let having less destroy their souls.

We are not living a fairy tale, so the reality is some do fall victim. But I find that most just continue to work hard with the resources they have to do the best they can.

They remain content with what they have and do the best they can to enjoy their existence. Their hearts are not heavy with the notion that the world owes them something.

Water Pump

I visited a village not far from where I am staying. I found out that the water pump used pump water from the borehole in the village wasn’t working.

The pump had remained broken for a long period of time because the people in the village weren’t able to afford to repair it. People had to walk quite a distance to another borehole  to get water to drink, cook, and bathe with.

Even so, the people remained content and humble. They maintained their dignity and humility with each other. They know they are all in the same boat, so they don’t try to rock the boat too much.

Water is life, so I donated the money to help bring life to the village, and  I am very thankful I was in the position to help. Now they have access to water in their village again.

Bringing Water Back to a Village
Bringing Water Back to a Village

From Mud to Stone

Many of houses in the village are mud houses. The locals can source the material locally to build mud houses for no cost or relatively low cost.

Mud houses are fine, and actually keep the living space cool. The issue with the way these particular mud houses are constructed is rain eventually erodes the mud.

Holes develop in the walls over time. There is an easy fix though, which is to reapply mud where is has eroded.

A more permanent solution is to replace the mud walls with stone blocks. I have started to help one person by donating stone blocks, and he is replacing the mud walls with them.

Transforming a Mud House into a Brick House
Transforming a Mud House into a Brick House

My Need to Help

Allah, the Most High Creator, instructs us to gain favor with him by giving what is important to us to help others. The Most High Creator instructs us to care about others.

I do understand as many will be appreciative, a few will see me as a cash cow. This can’t deter me, so I just proceed with caution.

I understand that Africa has been underdeveloped by colonization and imperialism, so I choose to help. We are only going to move forward if African people invest in each other, and I don’t expect that to be easy.

I help because there is opportunity for me to build in Africa, and it is good to be away from the white supremacy in America.

I choose to help myself by helping people who look like me, who want and  appreciate help. People who white supremacy, colonization, and imperialism attack and undermine throughout the world.

Though I am only one person, I do what I can. Let’s make Africa Great Again!

Related Links:
My Africa Journey
Alkaline Plant Based Diet Book
Alkaline Herbal Medicine
Faith and Justice Eat an Alkaline Plant Based Diet
Dr. Sebi nutritional guide
Animated Video: An Alkaline Plant Based Diet Heals
About Aqiyl Aniys
Do Africans Dislike African Americans? #ADOS

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About Author:

Aqiyl Aniys is the author of the books Alkaline Herbal Medicine, Alkaline Plant Based Diet and the children's book, Faith and Justice eat an Alkaline Plant Based Diet." He received a certificate in plant-based nutrition from Cornell University, a BA in Organizational Behavior and Communications from NYU, worked as an elementary school teacher, and studied social work. He enjoys boxing, kick boxing, cycling, power walking, and basically anything challenging, and his alkaline plant-based diet supports all that he does. Learn more about transitioning to an alkaline vegan diet using the Dr. Sebi nutritional guide.

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