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Find Your Vegan Protein Sources Here

By | April 19th, 2012 | Modified - June 7th, 2017
Find Your Vegan Protein Sources Here
Find Your Vegan Protein Sources Here

Vegan Protein Sources

Find your vegan protein sources here! Look no further! Many people have the misconception that only meat can supply you with the recommended daily allowance of protein.

Many people don’t know that there are vegan protein sources and that plants also contain protein. Plants contain proteins, which are nitrogen-based compounds, and their composition is better for the body than the composition of protein found in meat.

What Is Vegan Protein?

Vegan protein is nitrogen-based compounds which are also called amino acids. The body uses these nitrogen-based compounds to build and repair muscles, bones, blood cells, hair, skin, nails, and tissues.

The human body also uses these nitrogen-based compounds to make enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. The body also uses them to transport nutrients to the cells, and to regulate water.

Vegan protein is made up of varying combinations of 20 different amino acids, and our bodies can make eleven of the twenty amino acids. People depend on get the other nine amino acids from the foods they eat. These nitrogen-based compounds are called essential amino acids because the body doesn’t manufacture them.

Some of the combinations of amino acids form nitrogen-based compounds like keratin. This compound is found in skin, hair and nails. Hemoglobin carries oxygen throughout the body, and myosin helps muscles to contract.

It is important to get all the nine essential amino acids from the diet, which is easily obtainable from a well balanced vegan diet.

Learn More About the Alkaline Plant Foods on the Dr. Sebi Nutritional Guide »

How Much Protein Do We Need?

Science supports that people only need 10 percent of their total daily calories be from protein. A vegan diet easily supplies that percentage.

The recommended daily allowance for both men and women is .8 grams of protein for every kilogram, or .37 grams of protein for every pound of body weight.

Under this guideline a person weighing 170lbs should eat 63 grams of vegan protein a day. You can check if you are consuming the daily recommended allowance of vegan protein by using the NLE Vegan Protein Calculator.

The better measurement for determining the amount of protein you should consume is 10% of the total daily calories consumed.

Research suggests that women who are pregnant should eat and extra 20 grams of protein a day, and weightlifters should eat twice the recommended amount.

Vegans who eat a balanced plant based diet should not have any problem getting 10% of their total daily calories from vegan protein sources. Vegans get protein from vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, and legumes.

All plant-based wholefoods (vegetable, fruits, nuts/seeds, legumes, grains) contain some amount of vegan protein. In general, legumes, nuts, seeds, and grains contain a higher amount of protein per gram than do vegetables and fruits.

People who are concerned with maximizing their vegan protein consumption should increase their consumption of these vegan protein sources. May ask, “What do vegans eat for protein?” Your answer is below.

Vegan Protein Sources Chart

* Denotes recommended foods on Dr. Sebi’s nutritional guide, while other plant foods are listed to give a more comprehensive view of plant foods that contain plant-based protein.

Vegetable Protein “Greens”

Fruit Protein

Nut/Seed Protein

Legume Protein

Grain Protein

Amaranth
Artichokes
Avocado*
Barley Grass
Beets
Blue Green Algae
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Chayote*
Chlorella
Cucumbers*
Dandelion Greens*
Eggplant
Green peas
Green pepper*
Kale*
Lettuce
Mushrooms*
Mustard green
Onions*
Okra*
Potatoes
Spinach
Spirulina
Tomatoes (cherry and plum)*
Turnip greens
Watercress*
Wheatgrass
Yams
Zucchini*
Apple*
Banana (Burro)*
Cantaloupe*
Figs*
Grapes (seeded)*
Grapefruit
Orange (sour orange)*
Papaya*
Peaches*
Pears*
Pineapple
Strawberries*
Watermelon* (seeded)
Brazil Nuts*
Almonds
Cashews
Filberts
Hemp seeds*
Peanuts
Pumpkin seeds
Sesame seeds*
Sunflower seeds
Walnuts*
Garbanzo beans*
Kidney beans
Lentils
Lima beans
Navy beans
Soybeans
Split peas
Amaranth*
Barley
Black rice
Brown rice
Buckwheat
Kamut*
Millet
Oatmeal
Quinoa*
Rye*
Spelt*
Tef*
Wild rice*

Superfood powder

  • Hemp powder contains 35 grams of protein per 100 grams.

Best Vegan Protein Sources

Referenced from the USDA Nutritive Value of Foods guide – 2012

Food

Amount

Protein (grams)

Almonds 1cup 20 High in vegetable protein
Almond Butter 2 Tbsp 5
Amaranth (cooked)* 1 cup 9.3 High in vegan protein
Black beans (cooked) 1 cup 15 High in vegetable protein
Black-eyed peas (cooked) 1 cup 11
Brazil Nuts* 1cup 19 High in vegetable protein
Broccoli (cooked) 1 cup 4
Brown rice (cooked) 1cup 5
Cashews 1/4 cup 5
Chickpeas (cooked)* 1 cup 15 High in vegan protein
Hazelnuts (cooked) 1 cup 17 High in vegan protein
Kidney beans (red) 1 cup 15 High in vegan protein
Lentils (cooked) 1 cup 18 High in vegan protein
Lima beans (cooked) 1 cup 12
Peanut butter 1 Tbsp 4
Peas (cooked) 1 cup 9
Pinto beans (cooked) 1 cup 14
Potato 1 med. (6 oz) 4
Quinoa, cooked 1 cup 9
Rye (uncooked)* 1 cup 24.9 High in vegan protein
Sesame Seeds* 1 cup 25.5 High in vegan protein
Soybeans (cooked) 1 cup 29 High in vegan protein
Soy milk 1 cup 7
Soy yogurt 6 ounces 6
Spaghetti, cooked 1 cup 8
Spelt (cooked)* 1 cup 10.7 High in vegan protein
Spinach (cooked) 1 cup 6
Tahini (Sesame Seed Paste)* 1 Tbsp 2.6 High in vegan protein
Teff (cooked)* 1 cup 9.8 High in vegan protein
Walnuts* 1 cup 18 High in vegan protein
Wild Rice* 1 cup 6.5

References:
Happy Cow
WebMD – Guide to a Healthy Kitchen
Wikipedia – Spirulina (dietary supplement)
USDA – Nutritive Value of Foods
What are proteins and what do they do?

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Alklaine Plant Based Diet

About Author:

Aqiyl Aniys is the author of the books Alkaline Herbal Medicine, Alkaline Plant Based Diet and the children's book, Faith and Justice eat an Alkaline Plant Based Diet." He received a certificate in plant-based nutrition from Cornell University, a BA in Organizational Behavior and Communications from NYU, worked as an elementary school teacher, and studied social work. He enjoys boxing, kick boxing, cycling, power walking, and basically anything challenging, and his alkaline plant-based diet supports all that he does. Learn more about transitioning to an alkaline vegan diet using the Dr. Sebi nutritional guide.

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